HomeInVivo Biosystems BlogReproducibility of behavioral data from C. elegans transgenics with the ScreenChip system

Reproducibility of behavioral data from C. elegans transgenics with the ScreenChip system

As a service provider, we often use the same technologies/products that we provide to our customers to run experiments in our own lab. Recently, we put our own ScreenChip System to the test.

As part of a project for one of our customers, we used CRISPR-Cas9 to generate a complete gene knockout in C. elegans and assessed its effect on pharyngeal pumping. Pharyngeal pumping is considered to be a powerful indicator for overall health in worm models and is therefore a strong measurement to use.

For this project, our experts generated three independent strains with the same knockout to control for off-target effects.. We tested each one of these strains in triplicate with the ScreenChip platform using 32-47 worms per strain. We observed remarkable consistency in the data, both between worms (see small error bar) and strains (bars).

This strong consistency confirmed our success in generating transgenic C. elegans lines. In addition, it illustrates the reliability of the ScreenChip system to supply extremely reproducible pharyngeal pumping data, allowing us to confirm the phenotypic effect of knocking out our customer’s gene of interest.

Figure 1. Pharyngeal pumping data from 3 transgenic strains with the same gene knockout. Data acquired were highly reproducible across triplicate experiments using the ScreenChip System. Error bars shown are +/- 1 SD.

About the Author: Bethan Jones

x Dr. Jones is a Senior Data Scientist at NemaMetrix. She received her B.A. (Hons) in Biological Sciences from the University of Oxford and her Ph.D. at the University of Southampton (UK). A microbial ecologist by training, she is an expert on molecular biology R&D and data analysis, and has applied her skills to a diverse range of projects at Cambridge, Rutgers and Oregon State University. Before joining NemaMetrix, she was a scientist on a NASA project investigating the ecosystem and climate of the North Atlantic.
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